#materialscience

Research, development and commercial applications of advanced flexible materials.

Recent Articles

Biocompatibility Testing for Surface Medical Devices: An Overview

In Brief

All medical device companies must subject their products to a volley of FDA-approved tests to establish the safety of their devices. A particular series of these tests measure the biocompatibility of a product where a device/material cannot measure outside of acceptable tolerance ranges in the following "big three" categories: cytotoxicity, sensitivity, and irritation; other tests may be necessary. Furthermore, the types of tests each device must be subjected to vary according to the amount of contact the product has with a patient:

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3D Bioprinting in Orthopedics

In Brief

The use of flexible materials in the medical field has revolutionized the treatment of a variety of conditions. Orthopedics, in particular, has the potential to benefit enormously from the recent advances in 3D printing. Flexible materials in the form of hydrogels are dominating the research on hard and soft tissue scaffolding. The techniques using hydrogels to create biocompatible scaffolds allow for scalable, customizable products that encourage regeneration of damaged tissue. 

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Interview: Following up with Professor Charles Cooney on Bioprocessing

In Brief

We had the opportunity to sit down with Charles L. Cooney (Robert T. Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering, MIT) to discuss what he sees as being on the horizon for biopharmaceuticals and single-use; how the field has advanced since the publication of his white paper on continuous bioprocessing; and some of the advantages and challenges in single-use technology. An excerpt from our interview is published below:

 

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Challenges and Risks in Batch Bioprocessing

In Brief

Batch bioprocessing is the industry standard in biopharmaceutical production. Although the advancements in biomedical technology that have allowed for batch bioprocessing have been invaluable, some aspects of batch bioprocessing come with limits and challenges. 

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Mutual Dependence: Continuous Bioprocessing and Single-Use Systems

In Brief

The rise of continuous biomanufacturing (CBP) is tied to the ascendance of single-use systems (SUS). Single-use disposables enable CBP by providing a high degree of adaptability, reliability, and continuous yield that effective CBP operations require. In response to market trends that prioritize personalized medicines, many companies are gradually substituting their fixed, stainless-steel implementations for adaptable, flexible, and disposable systems.  Single-use disposables presently on the market include disposable sensors, connectors, bioreactors, and more.

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